Amphibious Assault Ship

LHD 8  -  USS Makin Island

 

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island patch crest insignia gung ho

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Wasp class amphibious assault ship multi purpose Ingalls shipbuilding Pascagoula Mississippi

Type, Class:

 

Amphibious Assault Ship (Multi Purpose) - LHD; Wasp - class (modified)

planned and built as LHD 8

Builder:

 

Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi, USA

STATUS:

 

Awarded: April 19, 2002

Laid down: February 14, 2004

Launched: September 22, 2006

Commissioned: October 24, 2009

ACTIVE / in service (Pacific Fleet)

Homeport:

 

San Diego, California

Namesake:

 

named after and in honor of the raid against Japanese forces on Makin Island in 1942 / WWII

> see history, below;

Ship's Motto:

 

“GUNG HO” was the Battle Cry of the Second Raider Battalion and the Motto of

USS MAKIN ISLAND (CVE 93). “Gung Ho” translated means “Work Together”.

Technical Data:

(Measures, Propulsion,

Armament, Aviation, etc.)

 

see: INFO > Wasp class Amphibious Assault Ship - LHD

 

ship images

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Indian Ocean 2012

Indian Ocean - May 2012

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 Indian Ocean 2012

Indian Ocean - May 2012

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Wasp class amphibious assault ship

Indian Ocean - May 2012

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island 2012

Indian Ocean - May 2012

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8

Indian Ocean - May 2012

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Wasp class

Indian Ocean - May 2012

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 Gulf of Aden 2012

Gulf of Aden - May 2012

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Arabian Gulf 2012

Arabian Gulf - March 2012

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Indian Ocean 2011

Indian Ocean - December 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Indian Ocean AH-1W Super Cobra

Indian Ocean - December 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 CH-46E Sea Knight HMM-268 REIN flight deck

CH-46E Sea Knight (HMM-268/REIN) - Pacific Ocean - December 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Pacific Ocean 2011

CH-46E Sea Knight (HMM-268/REIN) - Pacific Ocean - December 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 CH-53E Super Stallion HMM-268 REIN

CH-53E Super Stallion (HMM-268/REIN) - Pacific Ocean - December 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island flight deck HMM-268

Pacific Ocean - December 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - December 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island off Hawaii 2011

Pacific Ocean, off Hawaii - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island off Hawaii

Pacific Ocean, off Hawaii - November 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 off Hawaii 2011

Pacific Ocean, off Hawaii - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island San Diego California 2011

San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island San Diego 2011

San Diego - November 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 San Diego 2011

San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island San Diego

San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island San Diego

San Diego - November 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 San Diego

San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

San Diego - November 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8

San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island San Diego

San Diego - November 2011

 

USS Makin Island San Diego 2011 stern view

San Diego - November 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 Wasp class amphibious assault ship US Navy

San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island flight deck

San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

San Diego - November 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 and USS Peleliu LHA-5 San Diego

USS Peleliu (LHA-5) and USS Makin Island (LHD-8) - San Diego - November 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island CH-46E Sea Knight

Pacific Ocean - October 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Pacific Ocean

Pacific Ocean - October 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - October 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - October 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island 2011

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 stern view flight deck

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

Pacific Ocean - September 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island AH-1W Super Cobra flight deck

Pacific Ocean - August 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8

Pacific Ocean - August 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island 2011

Pacific Ocean - August 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island well deck LCAC operations

Pacific Ocean - August 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

San Diego, California - August 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

San Diego, California - June 2011

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 San Diego 2011

San Diego, California - June 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island AV-8B Harrier II flight deck

Pacific Ocean - February 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Mk-15 Phalanx CIWS live fire exercise

Pacific Ocean - January 2011

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island San Diego 2010

San Diego, California - October 2010

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 San Diego 2010

San Diego, California - June 2010

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island RIM-7 Sea Sparrow live fire exercise

RIM-7 Sea Sparrow live fire exercise - Pacific Ocean - February 2010

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island AV-8B Harrier II

Pacific Ocean - December 2009

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 AV-8B Harrier II VMA-311 take off

AV-8B (VMA-311) - Pacific Ocean - December 2009

 

RIM-7 Sea Sparrow Mk-29 missile launcher live fire exercise USS Makin Island LHD-8

RIM-7 Sea Sparrow (Mk-29 missile launcher) live fire exercise - Pacific Ocean - December 2009

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island commissioning ceremony San Diego 2009

San Diego - October 2009

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 commissioning ceremony San Diego October 2009

San Diego - October 2009

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island commissioning

San Diego - October 2009

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island

San Diego - September 2009

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 Strait of Magellan 2009

Strait of Magellan - August 2009

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Strait of Magellan 2009

Strait of Magellan - August 2009

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 Caribbean Sea 2009

Caribbean Sea - July 2009

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Caribbean Sea

Caribbean Sea - July 2009

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 Gulf of Mexico trials Ingalls

Gulf of Mexico - February 2009 (Ingalls Shipbuilding photo - via NNS)

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Gulf of Mexico 2009 trials

Gulf of Mexico - February 2009 (Ingalls Shipbuilding photo - via NNS)

 

USS Makin Island LHD-8 Gulf of Mexico 2008

Gulf of Mexico - December 2008

 

LHD-8 USS Makin Island Ingalls Northrop Grumman shipbuilding Pascagoula Mississippi

Pascagoula, Mississippi - August 2006

 

 

Namesake & History:

The Makin Island Raid (occurred on 17 - 18 August 1942) was an attack by the United States Marine Corps on Japanese military forces on Makin Island (now known as Butaritari Island) in the Pacific Ocean. The aim was to destroy Japanese installations, take prisoners, gain intelligence on the Gilbert Islands area, and divert Japanese attention and reinforcements from the Allied landings on Guadalcanal and Tulagi.


Preparations and organization

The raid was among the first American offensive ground combat operations of World War II. The force was drawn from the 2nd Raider Battalion and comprised a small battalion command group and two of the Battalion's six rifle companies. Because of space limitations aboard ship, each company embarked without one of its rifle sections. Battalion headquarters, A Company and 18 men from B Company - totaling 121 troops - were embarked aboard the submarine Argonaut and the remainder of B Company - totaling 90 men - aboard Nautilus. The raiding force was designated Task Group 7.15 (TG 7.15).

The Makin Atoll garrison consisted of the Japanese seaplane base led by Sgt. Major Kanemitsu with 73 naval air force personnel with light weapons.


Execution of the raid

The Marines were launched in rubber boats powered by small, 6 hp (4.5 kW) outboard motors shortly after 00:00 (midnight) on 17 August. At 05:13, Companies A and B of the 2nd Raider Battalion - commanded by Lt. Col. Evans Carlson - successfully landed on Butaritari. The landing had been very difficult due to rough seas, high surf, and the failure of many of the outboard motors. Lt. Col. Carlson decided to land all his men on one beach, rather than two beaches as originally planned. At 05:15, Lt. Oscar Peatross and a 12-man squad landed on Butaritari. In the confusion of the landing, they did not get word of Carlson's decision to change plans and land all the Raiders on one beach. Thus, Peatross and his men landed where they originally planned. It turned out to be a fortunate error. Undaunted by the lack of support, Peatross led his men inland.

At 07:00, with Company A leading, the Raiders advanced from the beach across the island to its north shore before attacking southwestward. Strong resistance from Japanese snipers and machine guns stalled the advance and inflicted casualties. The Japanese then launched two banzai charges that were wiped out by the Raiders, thus killing most of the Japanese on the island. At 09:00, Lt. Peatross and his 12 men found themselves behind the Japanese who were fighting the rest of the Raiders to the east. Peatross's unit killed eight Japanese and the garrison commander Sgt Mjr Kanemitsu, knocked out a machinegun and destroyed the enemy radios; but suffered three dead and two wounded. Failing to contact Carlson, they withdrew to the subs at dusk as planned.

At 13:30, 12 Japanese planes - including two flying boats - arrived over Butaritari. The flying boats - carrying reinforcements for the Japanese garrison - attempted to land in the lagoon, but were met with machinegun, rifle and anti-tank fire from the Raiders. One plane crashed; the other burst into flames. The remaining planes bombed and strafed but inflicted no U.S. casualties.


Evacuation of the Raiders

At 19:30, the Raiders began to withdraw from the island using 18 rubber boats, many of which no longer had working outboard motors. Despite heavy surf seven boats with 93 men made it to the subs. The next morning several boatloads of Raiders were able to fight the surf and reach the sub; but 72 men, along with just three rubber boats, were still on the island. At 23:30, the attempt by most of the Raiders to reach the submarines failed. Despite hours of heroic effort, 11 of 18 boats were unable to breach the unexpectedly strong surf. Having lost most of their weapons and equipment, the exhausted survivors struggled back to the beach to link up with 20 fully armed men who had been left on the island to cover their withdrawal.

At 09:00 on 18 August, the subs sent a rescue boat to stretch rope from the ships to the shore that would allow the remaining Raiders' boats to be pulled out to sea. But just as the operation began, Japanese planes arrived and attacked, sinking the rescue boat and attacking the subs, which were forced to crash dive and wait on the bottom the rest of the day. The subs were undamaged. At 23:08, having managed to signal the subs to meet his Raiders at the entrance to Makin Lagoon, Carlson had a team led by Lt. Charlie Lamb build a raft made up of three rubber boats and two native canoes, powered by the two remaining outboard motors. Using this raft, 72 exhausted Raiders sailed 4 miles from Butaritari to the mouth of the lagoon, where the subs picked them up.


Casualties

USMC casualties were given as 18 killed in action and 12 missing in action. Of the 12 Marines missing in action, one was later identified among the 18 Marine Corps graves found on Makin Island. Of the remaining eleven Marines missing in action, nine were inadvertently left behind or returned to the island during the night withdrawal. They were subsequently captured, moved to Kwajalein Atoll, and executed by Japanese forces. Two are MIA.


Recovery of fallen Marines

In 2000, 58 years after the raid, the remains of 19 Marines were found on Makin Island and identified at the Army's Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii. The remaining eleven Marines were never located. Six of these Marines were returned to their families for private burial ceremonies. The remaining 13 were buried with full honors at Arlington National Cemetery after a funeral service at Fort Myer Chapel at which the Marine Commandant General James L. Jones spoke.


Conclusions

Carlson reported that he had personally counted 83 Japanese bodies and estimated that 160 Japanese were killed based on reports from the Makin Island natives with whom he spoke. Additional Japanese personnel may have been killed in the destruction of two boats and two aircraft. Morison states that 60 Japanese were killed in the sinking of one of the boats.

Although the Marine Raiders succeeded in annihilating the Japanese garrison on the island, the raid failed to meet its other material objectives. No Japanese prisoners were taken, and no meaningful intelligence was collected. Also, no significant Japanese forces were diverted from the Solomon Islands area. In fact, because the vulnerabilities to their garrisons in the Gilbert Islands were highlighted by the raid, the Japanese strengthened their fortifications and defensive preparations on the islands in the central Pacific - one of the objectives of the raid, in so far as it would dissipate Japanese material and manpower - which may have caused heavier losses for U.S. forces during the battles of the Gilbert and Marshall Islands campaigns. However, the raid did succeed in its objectives of boosting morale and testing Raider tactics.

 

source: wikipedia

 

USS Makin Island (LHD 8):

 

USS Makin Island was laid down on 14 February 2004 by the Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi. She was christened on 19 August 2006, sponsored by Mrs. Silke Hagee, wife of General Michael Hagee, Commandant of the Marine Corps, and launched on 15 September 2006. In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, US Navy officials announced that several ships under construction at Ingalls Shipbuilding had been damaged by the storm, including Makin Island and two Arleigh Burke-class destroyers. The ship's completion was delayed due to rewiring during 2008 to repair incorrect wiring installation. On 21 October 2008 USS Makin Island qualified their first Surface Warfare Officer. After 15 months of training and studying, Ensign Ebony Miller, of Makin Island's deck department, became the first officer to earn a SWO pin at the command.

Makin Island was delivered to the US Navy on 16 April 2009 and was commissioned at Pascagoula, Mississippi without ceremony on 26 June 2009 with Captain Bob Kopas in command.

Makin Island departed 10 July 2009 on a transit around South America, during which the crew continued to train, obtaining underway certifications in preparation for its arrival in San Diego. During the transit, Makin Island conducted theater security cooperation (TSC) activities with Brazil, Chile and Peru, focusing on working closely with partner nation civil and maritime forces to share methods and training. She arrived in her home port of San Diego on 14 September 2009. Captain Kopas stated in an interview on local radio that the Makin Island had saved about $2 million in fuel, compared with a conventional propulsion system, on her voyage from Mississippi around South America to San Diego.

Her official commissioning ceremony took place on 24 October 2009 at Naval Air Station North Island, Coronado near San Diego. Six USMC veterans of the Makin Island raid attended the ceremony.

Damage to a turning gear delayed the ship's final check-out trials from August to September 2010.

Makin Island visited San Francisco in October 2010 as part of the city's 2010 Fleet Week festivities.

 

New propulsion system:

Makin Island departed on its maiden deployment, as the U. S. Navy’s first hybrid-drive warship: part electric and part gas. About 70 percent of the time, Makin Island can use the electric motors, saving on gas. When the ship needs to get from Point A to B quickly, at 12 knots or more, it uses the gas turbines.
Once on station, the ship’s mission changes. Its job then is to launch Marines ashore in small boats and aircraft. While the Marines are on the ground, the ship maneuvers in a small area at slow speed, "the perfect scenario" for the electric motor.
Fuel savings were said to be “impressive”. On an average day, the Makin Island uses 15,000 gallons of fuel, versus 35,000 to 40,000 gallons on an older steam ship of its type, said Capt. James Landers, commanding officer.
The downside is the logistical “tail,” which means it takes awhile to get parts. There are not many places in the world where the Makin Island will be able to plug in, because of the high voltage requirements of its system. Further, the ship is software dependent, which is an independent source of failure.

 

patches

 

 

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