Guided Missile Destroyer

DDG 67  -  USS Cole

 

 

DDG-67 USS Cole patch crest insignia

DDG-67 USS Cole - Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

Type, Class:

 

Guided Missile Destroyer; Arleigh Burke - class / Flight I;

planned and built as DDG 67

Builder:

 

Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi, USA

STATUS:

 

Awarded: January 16, 1991

Laid down: February 28, 1994

Launched: February 10, 1995

Commissioned: June 8, 1996

ACTIVE UNIT/ in commission (Atlantic Fleet)

Homeport:

 

Norfolk, Virginia, USA

Namesake:

 

Named after and in honor of Sergeant Darrell Samuel Cole (1920 - 1945)

> see history, below;

Ship's Motto:

 

GLORIA MERCES VIRTUTIS   ‘Glory is the Reward of Valor’

Technical Data:

(Measures, Propulsion,

Armament, Aviation, etc.)

 

see: INFO > Arleigh Burke - class Guided Missile Destroyer

 

ship images

 

DDG-67 USS Cole Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole fires her Mk-45 Mod.2 gun

 

USS Cole DDG-67

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole Valletta, Malta

 

DDG-67 USS Cole Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

USS Cole DDG-67 Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

USS Cole DDG-67

 

DDG-67 USS Cole - Souda Bay, Greece

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

USS Cole DDG-67

 

DDG-67 USS Cole SH-60B Seahawk LAMPS III

 

USS Cole DDG-67 Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

USS Cole DDG-67

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

DDG-67 USS Cole

 

USS Cole DDG-67

 

 

USS Cole (DDG-67) after terrorist attack - October 2000

DDG-67 USS Cole after terrorist attack - Aden, Yemen October 2000

 

DDG-67 USS Cole aboard MV Blue Marlin

 

USS Cole DDG-67 and MV Blue Marlin

 

 

Darrell Samuel Cole

 

Darrell Samuel Cole, Sergeant US Marine Corps Reserve

 

 

Namesake & History:

Sergeant Darrell Samuel Cole (July 20, 1920 – February 19, 1945):

 

Darrell Samuel Cole was born on 20 July 1920 in Flat River, Missouri. After graduating from high school in Esther, Missouri, he worked for the Civilian Conservation Corps as a forestry clerk and later was a machine operator in Detroit, Michigan. In August 1941, Cole enlisted in the Marine Corps Reserve and was sent to Parris Island, South Carolina for training, becoming a bugler after attending the Field Music School. He was transferred to the 1st Marines, 1st Marine Division and courageously participated in the Guadalcanal Campaign that began in August 1942, performing more like a machine gunner than a bugler. Immediately after the campaign, Cole put in for a transfer to perform the "regular duties" of a Marine Private First Class, but his request was denied "due to a shortage of field musics." He joined the 1st Battalion, 23d Marines, 4th Marine Division at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina in March 1943. In early February 1944, after another unsuccessful request for a occupational transfer, Cole participated in the invasion of Roi-Namur, on Kwajalein Atoll, again assuming duties as a machine gunner. His division then assigned him as a machine gun leader during the assaults on Saipan and Tinian in June and July 1944. When his squad leader was killed during a battle, Cole assumed command of the squad. For his combat performance on Saipan, he was awarded the Bronze Star.

Following the Marianas Campaign, Cole again requested a rating change. This time, his bravery and fighting skills were rewarded with approval of the application and, in November 1944, by promotion to Sergeant. By the time the 4th Division took part in the invasion of Iwo Jima on 19 February 1945, he was serving as leader of a machine-gun section. In the face of tremendous small-arms, artillery and mortar fire that day, Cole led his men against Japanese defenses. After the unit's progress was halted by three enemy pillboxes, he resumed the advance, at times by himself. Armed with only a pistol and grenades, he made a series of attacks against the hostile strongpoints. His third assault destroyed the Japanese position, but Cole was killed while making his way back to his squad. For his "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity" and "stouthearted leadership in the face of almost certain death", Darrell S. Cole was awarded the Medal of Honor.

 

 

Medal of Honor citation of Sergeant Darrell Samuel Cole, USMCR

(as printed in the official publication "Medal of Honor, 1861-1949, The Navy", page 168):

"For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty while serving as Leader of a Machine-gun Section of Company B, First Battalion, Twenty-third Marines, FOURTH Marine Division, in action against enemy Japanese forces during the assault on Iwo Jima in the Volcano Islands, 19 February 1945. Assailed by a tremendous volume of small-arms, mortar and artillery fire as he advanced with one squad of his section in the initial assault wave, Sergeant Cole boldly led his men up the sloping beach toward Airfield No. 1 despite the blanketing curtain of flying shrapnel and, personally destroying with hand grenades two hostile emplacements which menaced the progress of his unit, continued to move forward until a merciless barrage of fire emanating from three Japanese pillboxes halted the advance. Instantly placing his one remaining machine in action, he delivered a shattering fusillade and succeeded in silencing the nearest and most threatening emplacement before his weapon jammed and the enemy, reopening fire with knee mortars and grenades, pinned down his unit for the second time. Shrewdly gaging the tactical situation and evolving a daring plan of counterattack, Sergeant Cole, armed solely with a pistol and one grenade, coolly advanced alone to the hostile pillboxes. Hurling his one grenade at the enemy in sudden, swift attack, he quickly withdrew, returned to his own lines for additional grenades and again advanced, attacked and withdrew. With enemy guns still active, he ran the gantlet of slashing fire a third time to complete the total destruction of the Japanese strong point and the annihilation of the defending garrison in this final assault. Although instantly killed by an enemy grenade as he returned to his squad, Sergeant Cole had eliminated a formidable Japanese position, thereby enabling his company to storm the remaining fortifications, continue the advance, and seize the objective. By his dauntless initiative, unfaltering courage and indomitable determination during a critical period of action, Sergeant Cole served as an inspiration to his comrades, and his stout-hearted leadership in the face of almost certain death sustained and enhanced the highest tradition of the United States Naval Service. He gallantly gave his life for his country."

 

USS Cole (DDG 67):

 

On 12 October 2000, while at anchor in Aden, the Cole was attacked by Al-Qaeda suicide bombers, who sailed a small boat near the destroyer and detonated explosive charges. The blast created a hole in the port side of the ship about 40 feet (12 m) in diameter, killing 17 crewmembers and injuring 39. The ship was under the command of Commander Kirk Lippold.

Cole was returned to the United States aboard the Norwegian heavy-lift vessel MV Blue Marlin owned by Offshore Heavy Transport of Oslo, Norway. The ship was off-loaded 13 December 2000 from Blue Marlin in a pre-dredged deep-water facility at the Pascagoula, Mississippi, shipyard of Northrop Grumman Ship Systems, Ingalls Operations. After 14 months of repair, Cole departed on 19 April 2002, and returned to her homeport of Norfolk, Virginia.

The U.S. government offered a reward of up to US$5 million for information leading to the arrest of people who committed or aided in the attack on Cole. Al-Qaeda was suspected of targeting Cole because of the failure of a 3 January 2000 attack on USS The Sullivans, one of the 2000 millennium attack plots. On 4 November 2002, Ali Qaed Sinan al-Harthi, a suspected al-Qaida operative, who is believed to have planned the Cole attack, was killed by the CIA using an AGM-114 Hellfire missile launched from an MQ-1 Predator drone.

On 29 November 2003 Cole deployed for her first overseas deployment after the bombing and subsequently returned to her homeport of Norfolk, Virginia on 27 May 2004 without incident. In 2005 Cole participated in BALTOPS 05 with the Baltic Nations. Cole returned to the US in early July and was able to attend Fourth of July Celebrations in Philadelphia.

The Cole deployed to the Middle East on 8 June 2006 for the first time since the bombing. While passing the port city of Aden the crew manned the rails to honor the crewmembers killed in the bombing. She returned to her homeport of Norfolk on 6 December 2006 without incident.

On 21 August 2006, the Associated Press reported that the Cole's commanding officer at the time of the bombing, Commander Kirk Lippold, was denied promotion to the rank of Captain.

On 28 February 2008, the Cole was sent to take station off Lebanon's coast, the first of an anticipated three-ship flotilla.

On November 12, 2009, the Missile Defense Agency announced that the Cole would be upgraded during fiscal 2013 to RIM-161 Standard Missile 3 (SM-3) capability in order to function as part of the Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System.

 

patches

 

DDG-67 USS Cole insignia crest patch

 

 

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