Guided Missile Destroyer

DDG 52  -  USS Barry

 

 

ddg 52 uss barry crest insignia patch badge arleigh burke class guided missile destroyer us navy

DDG-52 USS Barry - Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

Type, Class:

 

Guided Missile Destroyer; Arleigh Burke - class / Flight I;

planned and built as DDG 52;

Builder:

 

Ingalls Shipbuilding, Pascagoula, Mississippi, USA

STATUS:

 

Awarded: May 26, 1987

Laid down: February 26, 1990

Launched: May 10, 1991

Commissioned: December 12, 1992

ACTIVE UNIT/ in commission (Atlantic Fleet)

Homeport:

 

Norfolk, Virginia, USA

Namesake:

 

Named after and in honor of Commodore John Barry (1745 - 1803)

> see history, below;

Ship's Motto:

 

STRENGHT AND DIVERSITY

Technical Data:

(Measures, Propulsion,

Armament, Aviation, etc.)

 

see: INFO > Arleigh Burke - class Guided Missile Destroyer

LINK:

 

see also: USS Barry (DD 933)

 

ship images

 

USS Barry (DDG 52) launches a Tomahawk missile against Libyan targets in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn.

Mediterranean Sea - March 29, 2011 (next 2 photos)

 

DDG-52 USS Barry launches a BGM-109 Tomahawk TLAM missile in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn

 

DDG-52 USS Barry launches a BGM-109 Tomahawk missile in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn

 

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USS Barry (DDG 52) launches a Tomahawk missile against Libyan targets in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn.

Mediterranean Sea - March 19, 2011 (next 4 photos)

DDG-52 USS Barry launches a Tomahawk missile against Libyan targets in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn

 

USS Barry DDG-52 launches a BGM-109 Tomahawk missile against Libyan targets in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn

 

USS Barry DDG-52 launches a Tomahawk cruise missile against Libyan targets in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn

 

DDG-52 USS Barry launches a BGM-109 Tomahawk TLAM against Libyan targets in support of Operation Odyssey Dawn

 

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DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry - Valletta, Malta

 

DDG-52 USS Barry - Valletta, Malta

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry - Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry - Mk-45 gun

 

DDG-52 USS Barry - Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

USS Barry DDG-52

 

USS Barry DDG-52

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

USS Barry DDG-52 - Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

USS Barry DDG-52

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry

 

DDG-52 USS Barry fires a Standard Missile MR from her Mk-41 VLS

 

DDG-52 USS Barry fires Standard Missile MR from her Mk-41 VLS

 

DDG-52 USS Barry - Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer AEGIS

 

 

John Barry

 

Commodore John Barry, US Navy   John Barry Commodore US Navy

 

Commodore John Barry US Navy   John Barry Commodore, US Navy

 

 

Namesake & History:

Commodore John Barry (1745 - September 13, 1803):

 

Born in Wexford, Ireland, in 1745; died in Philadelphia, 13 September 1803.

John Barry followed the sea from childhood, and at the breaking out of the hostilities between England and the Colonies, offered his services to Congress. His ship the Black Prince was purchased by the Government and named Alfred, in which John Paul Jones, as a Lieutenant, first hoisted the American (Grand Union) Flag.

Captain Barry was given command of Lexington, of 14 guns, on 7 December 1775. The Lexington sailed 31 March 1776. On 7 April 1776, off the Capes of Virginia, he fell in with the Edward, tender to the British man-of-war Liverpool, and after a desperate fight of one hour and twenty minutes captured her and brought her into Philadelphia. Barry continued in command of Lexington until 18 October 1776, and captured several private armed vessels during that time.

His next command was the Effingham, to which Congress had appointed him on 6 June 1776 while she was being built. On this ship he was actively and successfully employed guarding the Delaware Bay and Capes.

10 October 1776. Congress established the relative rank of officers of the Continental Navy and placed the name of John Barry No. 7 on the list of captains.

December 1776. Barry, having recruited a company of volunteers for land service, took part in the Trenton campaign. These volunteers and the marines cooperating with them were commended by General Washington. Barry acted as an aide to General Cadwalader, and was sent on several occasions as a bearer of important dispatches. His next duty was assisting in the defense of Philadelphia and operations in the upper Delaware. When the British took possession of Philadelphia in September 1777, Captain Barry was ordered to take the uncompleted Continental frigate Effingham up the Delaware River to a place of safety. In October, the ship was ordered sunk or burned. She was sunk on 2 November, near Bordentown, New Jersey, to deny her use to the British.

7 March 1778. He captured the armed schooner Alert of 20 guns, and two ships loaded with supplies for the British Army.

Barry next commanded the Raleigh, 32 guns. He sailed from Boston 25 September 1778, and two days later was chased and attacked by three of his Brittanic Majesty's vessels. After a nine hours running fight, he was obliged to run the Raleigh ashore on an island near the mouth of Penobscot Bay, but escaped to the mainland with most of his crew. Though he lost his ship, he was highly commended for the gallantry.

The privateer Delaware of 10 guns was the next ship assigned to Captain Barry.

In November 1780, Barry was ordered to command the Alliance, 32 guns, and took John Laurens, Special Commissioner, to France. Owing to the difficulty in obtaining a crew, this ship did not sail until 11 February 1781. On the passage to France, she captured the Privateer Alert of 12 guns. On the return voyage the Privateer Mars, 26 guns; and Minerva, 10 guns were made prizes.

29 May 1781. After several hours fighting, Barry captured H.B.M.S. Atlanta, 20 guns, and later the Trepassy, 14 guns. During the engagement with the Atlanta, Barry was wounded. He continued in command of the Alliance, capturing numerous prizes in 1782.

March 1783. The last Naval engagement of the Revolutionary War was fought by Barry in the Alliance against the British man-of-war Sybylle of 28 guns. Though the ship surrendered to him he was obliged to abandon it to escape from the rest of the squadron of which she was a part. At the time of the fight with the Sybylle, Barry was convoying the Duc de Lauzane, carrying money and supplies from the West Indies to the United States. His action enabled her to escape and reach port safely.

After the close of Revolutionary War, Captain Barry made several voyages in merchant vessels.

Upon reorganization of the Navy, 5 June 1794, Captain Barry was appointed No. 1 on the list of Captains. His commission was signed by General Washington, dated 22 February 1797. He was ordered to superintend the building of the frigate United States, 44 guns, and to command her when finished. He was actively engaged in the Naval War with France, 1798-1801 and captured a number of French vessels in the West Indies. By the direction of the Navy Department he brought the United States to Washington, where she was laid up. This ended Barry's active service. He was employed in testing cannon for the Government 1801-1802, and was selected to command the Mediterranean Squadron, but was too ill to take the duty. He died at his country residence near Philadelphia (Strawberry Hill).

 

USS Barry (DDG 52):

 

The fourth Barry (DDG 52) was launched on 10 May 1991 by Ingalls Shipbuilding Inc. and was commissioned into the U.S. Atlantic Fleet on 12 December 1992, being placed under the command of Commander Gary Roughead. The Commissioning ceremony took place at Naval Station Pascagoula in Mississippi.

 

On 21 October 1993, Captain Gary Roughead, Barry's first commanding officer was relieved by Commander James G. Stavridis.

 

In November 1993, Barry received orders to proceed to Haiti to take part in Operation Support Democracy.

 

On 20 May 1994, Barry departed Norfolk, Virginia on her first Mediterranean deployment. During Barry's maiden deployment, she served alongside the USS George Washington as the backdrop for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Barry also sailed the Mediterranean and Adriatic Seas as "Red Crown" in support of the No-Fly Zone over Bosnia-Herzegovina.

 

On 7 October 1994, Barry received orders to proceed to the Persian Gulf in response to Iraq's massing of troops on the Kuwaiti border. In what would become known as Operation Vigilant Warrior, Barry's participation included escort of both the George Washington and an amphibious assault group to anchorage off Kuwait City. Barry also served as alternate Persian Gulf Anti-Air Warfare Coordinator (AAWC), and principal Tomahawk strike platform during the crisis. Barry received a Meritorious Unit Commendation, the Southwest Asia Service Medal, the Armed Forces Service Medal, and the NATO Medal for her actions during the deployment and returned home to Norfolk, Virginia on 17 November 1994.

 

In October of 2004, Barry departed for the Persian Gulf in support of Operations Iraqi Freedom and Enduring Freedom as part of the USS Harry S. Truman (CVN 75) Carrier Strike Group. This deployment was part of Summer Pulse 2004, the simultaneous deployment of seven aircraft carrier strike groups (CSGs) which demonstrated the ability of the Navy to provide credible combat power across the globe within five theaters and with other U.S., allied, and coalition military forces. Summer Pulse was the Navy’s first deployment under its new Fleet Response Plan (FRP). During this deployment, Barry also participated in Somalia Operations in the Horn of Africa (HOA). Barry returned from this deployment in March of 2005.

 

In May of 2006, Barry deployed to West Africa and the Mediterranean Sea as an independently steaming unit. She participated in a port visit in Nigeria, as well as Joint Task Force Lebanon. Barry returned from this cruise in November of 2006.

 

During April and May of 2008, Barry participated in Exercise Joint Warrior 08-01 in the North Atlantic. This was a multi-lateral NATO exercise involving ships from over eight countries. Barry departed for a Mediterranean Sea/Persian Gulf deployment as part of Standing NATO Maritime Group Two (SNMG2) in August of 2008.

 

Barry has received many awards, including the Battenberg Cup for the years 1994, 1996, and 1998, earning her the nickname "Battenberg Barry" in the late 1990s. She has also been awarded the Battle E award 4 times, and received the Golden Anchor and Silver Anchor Awards for retention. More recently, in 2004 the Barry received the Arleigh Burke Fleet Trophy for being the most improved ship in the Atlantic Fleet.

 

patches

DDG-52 USS Barry patch crest insigniaUSS Barry DDG-52 patch crest insignia

 

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